The Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center is regularly featured in newspapers, on the radio, on blogs, and anywhere reliable information is needed.

In The News

Striving for adequate education funding

Fall River Herald News, April 26, 2016

"According to the Mass Budget and Policy Center’s website, www.massbudget.org, Chapter 70 aid for each district is determined by four basic steps."

Making movies in Mass. yields jobs, local spending

Wayland Town Crier, April 22, 2016

Noah Berger, president of the Massachusetts Budget Policy Center, said while there are some economic benefits created by the tax credit, the money often isn’t spent in the commonwealth. “A disproportionate share of the money leaves the state,” Berger said. “Most wages paid when movies are filmed go to out-of-state residents, largely movie stars.”

Film tax credit creates few jobs

Boston Herald, April 21, 2016

“The evidence just piles up that this is not an effec­tive economic development strategy, either by cost per job or any other measurable criteria,” said Noah Berger, president of the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center. “It’s increasingly clear that through this process we are not going to be able to build an industry in this state that can eventually survive without these subsidies, and that should be a goal of economic policy.”

Analysis finds temporary budget solutions 'troubliing'

Worcester Business Journal, April 19, 2016

But the left-leaning Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center says Massachusetts is too far removed from the recession to still be relying on "temporary solutions." "This far into an economic recovery the state should not need to rely on temporary solutions to balance the budget and should be fully implementing policies to be prepared for the next downturn," center officials wrote in a detailed 35-page analysis of the House Ways and Means Committee's budget bill on Monday. The center described the use of temporary solutions as "troubling."

Some worry Massachusetts' 'rainy day' fund not hefty enough

The Berkshire Eagle, April 16, 2016

"We are putting money into the rainy day fund, and that's a good thing, but less than what our existing laws say we should be putting into our rainy day fund," said Noah Berger, president of the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center.

The Economics of Public Education in the Marketplace

Non-Profit Quarterly, April 15, 2016

"In a 2011 report, the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center estimated that the state's public schools are underfunded by at least $2 billion."

Court predicts layoffs, enviro groups also knock House budget

New Boston Post, April 14, 2016

“On the bigger picture, it doesn’t really take on the big challenges like trying to make public higher education more affordable for families in Massachusetts or fixing our roads and bridges and public transit systems, and taking on those challenges is difficult. It would require new revenue. And as long as our state tax system is structured so that our highest income resident pay less of their income in taxes than everybody else it’s hard to raise the revenue,” said Noah Berger, the MassBudget president.

House budget spends more on schools, but is smaller than Baker’s

Politico, April 13, 2016

Berger notes the House budget proposal is measured, but skimps on tackling the commonwealth’s bigger picture issues. “Like the governor’s budget, it doesn’t take on some of the big challenges, like making higher education more affordable, expanding access to early education, or fixing our roads and bridges and transit systems,” Berger said. “But that’s hard. That would require new revenue.”

House Democrats’ state budget seeks to slow spending growth

WWLP.com, April 13, 2016

Noah Berger, president of the independent Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center, welcomed the additional Chapter 70 funds proposed by the House but said the overall budget falls short in many areas. “It doesn’t take on the bigger challenges like trying to make higher education more affordable for families in Massachusetts, or fixing our roads and bridges and public transit systems,” said Berger.

House budget differs from Gov. Charlie Baker on education, welfare

Springfield Republican, April 13, 2016

"Overall, this budget is much more like the governor's budget than it is different from the governor's budget," said Noah Berger, president of the liberal-leaning Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center. "On the positive side, it provides a little more funding for local schools.... On the bigger picture, though ... it doesn't really take on some of the big challenges, like making public higher education affordable again, expanding access to early education, fixing our roads and bridges and public transit system."

What happens if GE’s jobs don’t pan out?

Boston Globe, April 10, 2016

The trick is making sure that whatever gets built with the public funds has a real public benefit, added Noah Berger, president of the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center. It can’t just be about what GE needs. “If what we do makes that site more attractive to people in general, then we don’t have to worry so much about what in particular GE does,” Berger said. “The danger comes if it’s too narrowly tailored to one company.”

Civil rights groups intervene in charter case

Bay State Banner, April 8, 2016

According to a Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center report released this week: “Since charter schools tend to educate fewer in-district special education students and the formula doesn’t account for this difference, they often end up receiving a disproportionate share of district special education funding.“

Why Hollywood isn’t the hero for shutting down Georgia’s anti-LGBT bill

Salon, March 30, 2016

The (film tax) credit costs the state $80 million every year, according to the progressive Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center.

AMID CHARTER BATTLE, CITIES IN PUSH FOR MORE STATE EDUCATION AID

State House News Service, March 21, 2016

According to estimates from the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center, Chelsea -- along with the cities of Lynn, Revere, Worcester, Everett and Brockton -- is among the municipalities where the adjustments result in the most significant drop in Chapter 70 aid from what would have been expected, though no communities are slated for Chapter 70 cuts. Research conducted by MassBudget found that the governor's proposed low-income changes increase Chapter 70 "modestly for many districts," though some districts receive less than they would have under the old methods. The center suggested that the state could carry over its old low-income percentages as a temporary stopgap while working to refine its counting of students.

Amid charter battle, cities push for more state education aid

Milford Daily News, March 21, 2016

Research conducted by MassBudget found that the governor's proposed low-income changes increase Chapter 70 "modestly for many districts," though some districts receive less than they would have under the old methods. The center suggested that the state could carry over its old low-income percentages as a temporary stopgap while working to refine its counting of students.

Ash: Corporate tax law change would boost state’s competitiveness

Channel 22 WWLP.com, March 9, 2016

“There’s no evidence that it achieved any public purpose,” MassBudget President Noah Berger told the News Service. Berger argued corporate tax structure is less of a factor in where companies locate than access to “well trained workers and good infrastructure.”

Advocates eye ‘millionaire’s tax’ for new transportation funding

Boston.com, March 9, 2016

Noah Berger, of the left-leaning Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center, which analyzes state financing, estimates that if the question made the ballot and voters gave their approval, the new tax would generate upwards of $1.5 billion per year. If the funds were split evenly between transportation and education, about $750 million would go to transportation. Other estimates have suggested the amount of total revenue raised could be closer to $2 billion.

Deaf say services are lacking in Massachusetts

Worcester Telegram & Gazette, March 4, 2016

According to the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center, the commission budget has decreased by about 17 percent since fiscal 2009.

Town Manager issues statement on Reading’s financial situation

Daily Times Chronicle, March 3, 2016

One significant factor limiting this revenue is the collapse of inflation adjusted state aid: since 2001 the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center cites state aid as declining by 51% in real terms.

Workers and employers win with paid leave

Boston Globe, February 26, 2016

Right now, about 40 percent of the workforce is not eligible (link to MB paper) for family and medical leave through the federal Family and Medical Leave Act because workers are employed by companies with fewer than 50 employees.

Survey: State funding covers half the cost of homeless services

MetroWest Daily News, February 25, 2016

According to the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center, the account's inflation-adjusted funding level in fiscal 2001 was $49.1 million.

Trial by the Hour: The minimum wage just went up — but the fight for a living wage is more urgent than ever

The Valley Advocate, February 24, 2016

On Jan. 1, the Massachusetts minimum wage rose from $9 to $10 an hour, and it will rise again in 2017 to $11 an hour — an increase that will affect the wages of approximately 450,000 workers in the state, according to the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center.

Putting families on the path to self-sufficiency

TheBostonPilot.com, February 19, 2016

In 1968, the Massachusetts minimum wage was worth $10.52 (adjusted for inflation). Today, it is $8. And over the course of a year, that difference adds up. A full-time worker earning the minimum wage today makes $5,000 a year less than a full-time minimum wage worker earned in 1968. ("What Its Worth? The Value of the Minimum Wage in Massachusetts"; Mass Budget and Policy Center).

He’s Mr. Popularity; now can Charlie Baker deliver?

Boston Globe, February 18, 2016

Noah Berger, president of the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center, believes that much can be done to improve the performance of many state agencies, but, he says, “it’s very hard to deal with the very big challenges our state faces without additional revenue.”

In UMass budget battle, costs may be passed to students, some say

Bay State Banner, February 17, 2016

“Public graduates are also more likely to stay in Massachusetts after graduation, contributing to our economy over the long term,” asserts MassBudget’s statement. “Despite the evidence that a highly educated workforce helps strengthen our state economy, Massachusetts has cut state support for higher education by 20 percent since FY 2001, adjusting for inflation.”

State spending is under control, except for health care

Boston Globe, February 4, 2016

Uses MassBudget spending data.

Gov. Charlie Baker Rolled Out His $39.6b Budget Yesterday

Politico, January 28, 2016

Noah Berger, president of the independent Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center, was skeptical of the single sales factor’s benefits, citing a study by economist David Merriman which found tweaking states’ single sales factor tax systems ‘has no statistically significant impact on manufacturing employment’ in that state. "The tax break ‘looks like it will ultimately cost $67 million a year and that’s a tax break where there’s been no evidence it’s been effective in the past and there’s no reason to believe spending that much money on it in the future will be effective," Berger told reporters. "Currently, the state spends $200 million for the tax break. The change will raise the figure to $267 million, according to MassBudget’s estimates.”

Charlie Baker unveils budget; no new taxes

Boston Herald, January 28, 2016

Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center President Noah Berger slammed Baker’s proposal for a corporate tax break, called a single sales factor tax, in the otherwise “status-quo budget.” “There is no evidence that it’s been effective in the past and there’s no reason to believe that spending that much money on it in the future will be effective,” Berger said.

Governor would hold MassHealth spending increase to 5%

Boston Globe, January 28, 2016

“The big picture is that health care costs have been rising rapidly across the country for a very long time, and state programs that provide health care are affected very significantly by the overall costs,” said Noah Berger, president of the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center, a research organization. “That’s having an effect on the state’s bottom line.” Berger noted that the federal government reimburses about half of MassHealth spending, because it is a joint state-federal program, softening the blow on state coffers.

Baker Set to Release Fiscal 2017 Budget Bill

NECN, January 27, 2016

The Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center, in a separate analysis, projected the gap to be $684 million.

As Baker readies budget plan, groups warn of shortfalls

The Washington Times, January 27, 2016

“It is even more unlikely that we will see a budget that will raise new revenue to fund investments in the future of our Commonwealth: like making higher education affordable again and modernizing our roads and bridges and public transportation systems,” (MassBudget) said."

Mass. facing $635 million budget gap, officials say

Boston Globe, January 27, 2016

“I think Baker is focused on running the government as effectively and efficiently as possible, and that’s a very good thing,” said Noah Berger, president of the liberal-leaning Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center. “But I think the problem he’s going to come up against more and more is that solving some of our big problems like fixing our transportation system, making higher education more affordable, strengthening our public schools, and expanding pre-K require revenue as well as reforms.”

What’s In Gov. Baker’s Proposed Budget And What’s Left Behind

Radio Boston, January 27, 2016

Radio interview with Noah Berger

Baker says nearly $40B budget holds line on spending, taxes

Boston Herald, January 27, 2016

Noah Berger, president of the independent Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center, said it was largely a "status quo" budget despite some positive elements. "There are no major new efforts to expand access to early education, to make higher education more affordable, or to make new investments in fixing our transportation infrastructure," Berger said in a statement.

Baker budget’s focus is fiscal restraint: No new taxes, fees and limited spending growth

CommonWealth Magazine, January 27, 2016

Noah Berger, president of Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center, credited the governor with reducing the reliance on one-time revenues to balance spending, but questioned some of the governor’s priorities. “I think there are other choices in this budget. I think that when you’re spending $67 million on an expanded corporate tax break that hasn’t worked in the past that might be the first place to look in terms of finding money to invest in things like making higher education more affordable or fixing our transportation infrastructure,” Berger said.

Advocates debate millionaire tax

Bay State Banner, January 27, 2016

Representatives of the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center noted that the state’s highest income households now pay a lower share of household income in taxes than other Massachusetts households, as Kaufman pointed out. MassBudget’s recent report also finds that transportation infrastructure investments create a competitive advantage over other states and regions.

Baker unveils new budget, tweak to corporate tax break calculation

Politico, January 27, 2016

“While the Governor's budget reportedly proposes paying for part of this cost by reforming the state's film tax credit, ultimately the proposal to spend $67 million to expand this tax credit should be weighed against other potential investments such as making college more affordable, expanding access to early education, improving our schools, or fixing our transportation infrastructure,”

Gov. Charlie Baker's proposed $39.5B budget shows 3.5 percent increase, but no tax or fee hikes

Springfield Republican, January 27, 2016

Noah Berger, president of the liberal-leaning Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center, said he would like to see Baker spend more money on services like education and transportation. "A lot of it is a very much a status quo budget," Berger said. "There aren't significant new investments in things like making higher education more affordable or expanding access to early education or improving our K-12 schools or fixing our transportation system."

What Are States Going To Do To Make Higher Ed More Affordable?

Huffington Post, January 25, 2016

Moore said it would cost Massachusetts $127 million to make community college free for all students, citing a report from the nonprofit Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center.

Milton preschool illustrates haphazard state funding

Boston Globe, January 24, 2016

“Overall, funding for early education has been basically flat over the last 10 years,” said Noah Berger, president of the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center, a nonpartisan group that tracks and analyzes the state budget. “There were some increases immediately after 2005 and cuts during the Great Recession and then some modest increases since then. But overall, we’re just about where we started.”

Baker seeks to spread tax break to all industries

Boston Business Journal, January 24, 2016

Noah Berger, the president of the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center, said the disparity may be so great because manufacturers and mutual fund managers are best-positioned to take advantage of the altered tax formula. Unlike a traditional retailer, for example, they can make sales across the country without necessarily needing a physical presence in many different locations.

To woo GE, state and city painted bright picture

Boston Globe, January 15, 2016

“I haven’t seen any evidence that we needed to do that kind of package,” said Noah Berger, president of the left-leaning Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center. “[But] if we’re doing infrastructure work, that’s good for our state, and GE is the beneficiary of it, that’s much more efficient than tax giveaways.”

Noah Berger of MassBudget on GE's Move to Boston

WRKO Morning Show, January 15, 2016

Noah Berger radio interview

Backed by subsidies, GE shops for real estate

Boston Globe, January 13, 2016

If city and state officials stick to underwriting related improvements, rather than giving GE a tax cut, then Boston should make out OK in the deal, said Noah Berger, president of the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center. “You don’t want to divert resources from our region’s long-term strengths,” he said. “Make investments that stay in our community.”

Massachusetts raises minimum wage in 2016

The Chelmsford Independent, January 9, 2016

The increase will affect an estimated 450,000 full-time workers, 81 percent of whom are ages 20 or older, according to the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center.

Basic Black: Massachusetts Economy in Black and Green

WGBH TV, January 8, 2016

Panel discussion of State of Black Massachusetts report, commissioned by the Urban League of Eastern Massachusetts

Mass. Minimum Wage Rises To $10 An Hour

WBUR, January 1, 2016

By one estimate, from the liberal-leaning Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center, nearly half a million workers in the state will see “modest increases in their paychecks” because of the newly raised pay floor.

Some hourly workers in Attleboro area to see boost to pay with rise in minimum wage

Attleboro Sun Chronicle, January 1, 2016

The Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center estimates about 450,000 workers will benefit statewide from the higher minimum wage.

Massachusetts minimum wage increases, state income tax decreases take effect today

MassLive.com, January 1, 2016

According to the left-leaning Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center, the increase in 2016 to $10 an hour will affect 450,000 workers.

State’s minimum wage increase $1 on January 1st

WWLP.com Channel 22, December 31, 2015

The Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center said about 450,000 workers will benefit from the hike. 23-percent are parents.

$10 minimum wage goes into effect Jan. 1 in Mass.

myfoxboston.com, December 30, 2015

The Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center says about 450,000 workers will benefit from the latest hike. The center says about 60 percent of those workers are women and 23 percent are parents.

280,000 low-wage workers in Massachusetts to get New Year’s raise

SAMPAN, December 30, 2015

By 2017, increasing the minimum wage to $11 per hour will raise the wages of approximately 450,000 workers in Massachusetts, according to the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center. The legislation also increases wages for tipped workers to $3.75 per hour by 2017. Current law sets wages at $2.63 for tipped workers.

Twin boosts for low-income workers on Jan. 1

Boston Globe, December 28, 2015

“We still have a long way to go to make sure that everyone who works for a living can earn a living, but [an 11 percent] pay raise is pretty significant,” said Noah Berger, president of the left-leaning Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center.

Massachusetts' hourly minimum wage to rise in 2016

Boston Herald, December 27, 2015

The Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center says about 450,000 workers will benefit from the latest hike. The center says about 60 percent of those workers are women and 23 percent are parents.

Editorial: Budget blues linger

Boston Herald, December 21, 2015

The Boston Globe explained recently that the “massive income tax cut” approved by voters in 2000 — which has happened in tiny increments, over a decade and a half — is the single source of the state’s ongoing budget woes. The Globe cited an analysis by the left-leaning Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center that suggests the tax rollback has “cost” the state $2 billion in revenue each year. Senate Ways and Means chairman Karen Spilka last week also cited a $2 billion figure.

Tax bills to increase in both towns

The Hamilton-Wenham Chronicle, December 17, 2015

“The overall level of taxation has declined dramatically as percentage of income in Massachusetts,” said Noah Berger, executive director of MassBudget. In Massachusetts, according to the report, state and local taxes equal 10.1 percent of total personal income, compared to a national average of 10.4 percent.

A Disingenuous Ruling on Immigration

Huffington Post, December 14, 2015

In Massachusetts, for example, an $80 fee not only covers the cost of producing a license, but also provides a tidy profit to the treasury (cites to MassBudget report on immigrant driver's licenses).

What is happening to the state’s rainy day fund?

Boston Globe, December 9, 2015

Ultimately, though, it was voters who created this budget problem and bequeathed it to politicians, by approving a ballot initiative in 2000 that set the income tax rate on a downward course from 5.95 to 5 percent. That cut continues to cost the state nearly $2 billion every year, according to an analysis from the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center, a nonprofit and left-leaning research organization.

The Mass. Millionaires Who Want Higher Taxes

Radio Boston, December 2, 2015

Cites MassBudget data

Noah Berger of MassBudget on Increasing Taxes on the Rich

WRKO Morning Show, December 1, 2015

Radio interview with Noah Berger, MassBudget President.

Millionaire’s tax could raise extra $2.2b

CommonWealth Magazine, November 30, 2015

Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center President Noah Berger, whose research has been used and cited by the Raise Up Massachusetts coalition, said he believes the DOR estimate is the “newer” and “most accurate” projection, and accounts for inflation between now and 2019. If valued today, Berger said the revenue estimate would probably be closer to $1.7 billion. “I think that it means that there’s lot of income over a million in Massachusetts. The number is what it is,” he said. MassBudget reports that from 1979 through 2011, incomes for the highest 1 percent of earners in Massachusetts grew at a rate 10 times faster than the bottom 90 percent, capturing almost half of all income growth in the state during that period.

Report says Mass. tax burden is 24th highest in U.S.

Quincy Patriot Ledger, November 23, 2015

Using new tax and income data from the U.S. Census Bureau and U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis, the nonprofit Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center recently released an analysis that ranks Massachusetts as having the 24th highest tax burden in the nation. The report calculated tax burden as a percentage of income. “The overall level of taxation has declined dramatically as percentage of income in Massachusetts,” said Noah Berger, executive director of MassBudget. In Massachusetts, according to the report, state and local taxes equal 10.1 percent of total personal income, compared to a national average of 10.4 percent.

Mass taxes rank in the middle

Georgetown Record, November 18, 2015

“The overall level of taxation has declined dramatically as percentage of income in Massachusetts,” said Noah Berger, executive director of MassBudget. In Massachusetts, according to the report, state and local taxes equal 10.1 percent of total personal income, compared to a national average of 10.4 percent.

Using data to improve the lives of children and their families

Children's Health Watch Blog, October 27, 2015

On the one hand, the recent U.S. Census data give us reason to congratulate ourselves...Thanks to our nation-leading health care reform initiative driven by a broad coalition of community activists, health care providers, policy-makers, and forward-thinking business leaders, Massachusetts continues to lead the way in making sure that almost every single child has access to health insurance... On the other hand, the U.S. Census data give us reason for pause. We are half a decade out of the recession, yet the benefits of our country’s great economic prosperity are not finding their way to many of our youngest residents.

Congressman James McGovern, advocates focus on solutions to student-debt crisis at UMass forum

Daily Hampshire Gazette, October 15, 2015

Luc Schuster of the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center said his organization’s estimates show that the state could offer free tuition and fees to all public university and community college students for between $325 million and $631 million, depending on whether it subsidized books and transportation fees and other expenses associated with higher education.

How to earn profits and avoid taxes

Bay State Banner, October 14, 2015

Massachusetts misses out on about $600 million each year as a result of these strategies. That’s substantial, enough for a massively expanded early-education program, for instance (link to MassBudget early ed report).

State’s rainy day fund has dwindled over past decade

Boston Globe, October 5, 2015

Noah Berger, president of the liberal-leaning Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center, said the diminished size of the fund and the state’s propensity to drain it worries him. If Massachusetts hasn’t built up enough of a reserve for the next recession, he said, “the state will have to cut deeply into funding for important things like K-12, higher education, aid to cities and towns, and transportation” — or raise taxes.

Helping low-income families out of poverty

Commonwealth Magazine, September 30, 2015

According to the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center, over the past decade, funding has been reduced for adult education, job training, child care subsidies, housing, and many other programs that help those in poverty cover the basic expenses and pursue the education and training needed to become economically secure. Since the largest user of these services are women looking to improve the lives of their families, they and their children bear the brunt of these budget cuts.

80 Percent in State Drive to Work: How Are Undocumented Getting There?

Public News Service, September 29, 2015

Eighty percent of state residents rely on a vehicle to get to work, according to a new Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center report.

Mass. lawmakers weigh new tax breaks for businesses

Lawrence Eagle Tribune, September 28, 2015

A recent report by the nonprofit Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center found that the value of the state's business tax credits has more than doubled in two decades, from $342 million in 1996 to more than $770 million in 2012.

IBM granted $2.5M in tax breaks for locating digital health venture

Boston Globe, September 23, 2015

“Compared to other tax breaks, it’s a relatively modest amount of money,” said Noah Berger, president of the left-leaning Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center. “The problem is that there’s no evidence that these jobs wouldn’t have been created without the tax break. . . . Ultimately, we need to keep our eye on the ball and focus on fundamentals, like making sure we have a well-educated, highly skilled workforce.”

New tax breaks for businesses weighed

The Salem News, September 22, 2015

A recent report by the nonprofit Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center found that the value of the state’s business tax credits has more than doubled in two decades, from $342 million in 1996 to more than $770 million in 2012.

The rich who say tax me more

Boston Globe, September 18, 2015

In Massachusetts, everyone pays a flat state tax rate of 5.15 percent, and under the proposed tiered structure (includes link to MassBudget report), all earnings over $1 million would be taxed 4 percentage points higher.

Massachusetts Incomes Rise Slightly, Poverty Rate Stays The Same

Radio Boston, September 17, 2015

Radio interview with Noah Berger

Expanded pre-kindergarten in Springfield, Holyoke part of Beacon Hill push

Springfield Republican, September 16, 2015

The Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center, a liberal-leaning research institute, estimated that providing full-day pre-kindergarten for 3- and 4-year-olds through the public schools would cost between $860 million and $1.48 billion a year. Other options involving partnerships with private providers could be cheaper.

Free public higher education is within our grasp

Daily Hampshire Gazette, September 16, 2015

The Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center has shown that to cover the tuition and fees for every current public higher education student in Massachusetts would cost $631 million.

Tuition and fee freezes end for UMass students after budget talks take center stage over summer

Massachusetts Daily Collegian, September 9, 2015

According to the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center, the state has cut higher education spending, in real terms, by 25 percent over the last 14 years.

NightSide w/ Dan Rea - The True Cost Of Debt-Free College Education

WBZ Radio, September 9, 2015

Radio interview with Noah Berger

An Economy that Works for Everyone

Reading Patch, September 8, 2015

As the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center pointed out in its Labor Day 2015: Important Gains, Many Challenges for MA Workers analysis, “Since the late 1970s, wages and incomes for most working families have stagnated. By contrast, for the highest income households, incomes have grown at ten times the rate of income growth for the bottom 90% of the population.”

Beacon Hill Earmarks: Justifiable Shortcuts, Or Political Pork?

WGBH, August 31, 2015

"Earmarks, like every other part of government, can be good, or can be bad — it’s a matter of judging the merits of each individual one," Berger said. "The important thing about earmarks is that they should be subject to the same standards as everything else."

Hearing set on free community college bill

The Barnstable Patriot, August 28, 2015

According to the nonprofit Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center, the net cost of eliminating tuition and fees at Massachusetts community colleges, based on fiscal 2013 data, would be an additional $127 million a year. That cost would be on top of $192 million in federal Pell grants, scholarships and other public sources of student support already in place.

Most school districts can’t put brakes on bus fees

Boston Globe, August 20, 2015

While the foundation budget “was adjusted for inflation, it hasn’t been updated since 1993,” said Noah Berger, president of Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center, a nongovernmental research group. “With a funding system based on 1993 operating in 2015, we see a lot of gaps between actual costs and the funding that the state provides. And because of those gaps, districts are forced to increase fees and not provide the quality of education that would be best for our children.”

Free community college proposal to get September hearing

Fall River Herald News, August 20, 2015

“We’re a state economy that depends in large part on the education of the state’s workforce,” (Luc Schuster) said. “We don’t have a lot of natural resources to drive the economy. People who attend institutions of public higher education, in particular, are more likely to stay in-state and contribute to our economy in the long term.”

Is DCF better or worse off than a year ago?

Boston Globe, August 12, 2015

Includes DCF budget information from MassBudget's Budget Browser.

Free public higher education is within state’s reach

Daily Hampshire Gazette, August 12, 2015

Recently the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center issued a report that shows that free public higher education is within our grasp. It would cost the state about $127 million to eliminate tuition and fees for all current community college students, about $198 million for state university students excluding UMass (or $325 million for both community college and state university combined), and about $631 million for state students at all campus types including UMass.

Activists advancing millionaires’ tax

Bay State Banner, August 12, 2015

Noah Berger, president of the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center, agrees that this new cash flow could have a big impact on the state. “Most economists feel that the foundations for state economic strength are having a well-educated work force and transportation and other infrastructure that supports business activity,” he says. “Generating over a billion dollars a year to invest in education and transportation could significantly improve the long-term prospects of the state.”

Companies struggling to recruit, train skilled workers

The Salem News, August 4, 2015

The state spent more than $42 million in the last budget year on workforce development and training, career centers and employment programs, according to the nonprofit Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center.

Liberal groups propose higher tax for top earners: Ballot measure would aid transit projects, schools

Boston Globe, July 23, 2015

(T)he new revenue would allow the state to reverse what they say is chronic underinvestment in areas such as early education and public transit. “That would help a lot of families around Massachusetts,” said Noah Berger, president of the left-leaning Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center. “It would also strengthen our economy in the long run.”

Are US children being left behind in economic recovery? Report finds more living in poverty than before the Great Recession

Boston Globe, July 21, 2015

Twenty-two percent of American children were living in poverty in 2013 compared with 18 percent in 2008, according to the latest Kids Count Data Book, with poverty rates nearly double among African-Americans and American Indians and problems most severe in South and Southwest.

Report: Despite economic recovery, poverty a problem in state, Brockton

Brockton Enterprise, July 21, 2015

A national survey of the economic, educational, health and community well-being of children, released on Tuesday, shows that despite years of economic recovery, more children in Massachusetts are living in poverty than during the Great Recession. About one in six children – 16 percent – in Massachusetts is stranded in poverty. That is up from 12 percent in 2008, according to the 2015 KIDS COUNT Data Book from the Annie E. Casey Foundation.

How Much It Would Cost To Make College Free In Massachusetts… Or At Least Less Expensive

WBUR Learning Lab, July 21, 2015

In a report released this week, the nonpartisan Boston-based policy analysis group explores options that would make public higher education in Massachusetts have a much more affordable price tag: free. The options they explore would come with a cost of between $325 million and $631 million a year for the state, with various methods of eliminating tuition and fees for in-state students at community colleges and state universities. “Making higher education much more affordable and making it possible for kids to graduate debt-free would not only help those kids and our economy, but it’s something that could be done at a reasonable cost,” said Noah Berger, president of Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center.

Bringing an end to film tax credits

Boston Globe, July 16, 2015

According to the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center, the film program has generated only 430 net jobs each year for Massachusetts residents. Those jobs paid an average salary of $70,000, yet each one cost the state more than $119,000. Similarly, the subsidies have returned only about 14 cents in new revenue to the Commonwealth for every taxpayer dollar forgone.

EITC helps the working middle class

Boston Globe, July 14, 2015

Increasing the EITC fosters the strength of hard-working families. According to the Massachusetts Center for Budget and Policy, the federal EITC and the federal Child Tax Credit combined to lift 9.4 million Americans out of poverty in 2013, five million of them children. In Massachusetts, these two federal tax credits — even without figuring in the state’s separate EITC — combined to help keep roughly 74,000 Massachusetts children out of poverty.

State budget supports Baker on MBTA overhaul

Boston Globe, July 7, 2015

Noah Berger, the president of the liberal-leaning Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center, said the earned income tax credit increase “will help hundreds of thousands of working families pay for basic necessities like clothing and nutritious food for their kids.” He pointed to studies that he said show “when the income of low-wage families increases, there are long-term positive effects on the children: They do better in school and earn more as adults.”

Momentum grows for earned income credit

Littleton Independent, June 18, 2015

“Doubling the state Earned Income Tax Credit could raise incomes of some low-income working families by $900 per year,” said Noah Berger, executive director of the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center. “Money could be used for basic necessities such as rent, food and taking care of kids, or it could be used for things like after-school programs.”

The ACA is Good For Massachusetts (Budget Impact Edition)

Health Care For All Blog, June 17, 2015

The study correctly identifies health spending growth as the most critical ongoing budget problem. The boost in federal funds doesn't affect long-term growth trends. We must continue to take steps to reduce health care cost growth.

Temporary Medicaid coverage after Massachusetts Health Exchange website failed cost $650 million, state says

Springfield Republican, June 16, 2015

A new study by the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center found that while state spending on MassHealth and related health care costs increased by $1.17 billion between fiscal year 2014 and 2015, federal reimbursements for health care grew by $1.02 billion. Much of this is due to higher federal reimbursement rates when the state expanded eligibility for MassHealth and other subsidized health insurance programs.

To 'be great,' we have to stop underfunding public universities

Springfield Republican, June 15, 2015

Massachusetts cut state funding per student by 36.3 percent between fiscal years 2008 and 2014, according to the Center for Budget and Policy Priorities. That's more than 42 other states over the same period of time, including Texas and every New England state except New Hampshire, which was a close sixth. The statistics are nearly as stark over the past 15 years.

Looming cut to kindergarten grants alarming

MetroWest Daily News, June 13, 2015

All districts with kindergarten-aged students must provide at least a part-time program - a total of 425 hours per school year or roughly 2.5 hours per day, according to the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center.

Looming cut to kindergarten grants alarming

Hudson Sun, June 13, 2015

All districts with kindergarten-aged students must provide at least a part-time program - a total of 425 hours per school year or roughly 2.5 hours per day, according to the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center.

Mara Dolan Interview

980 WCAP, June 1, 2015

For audio of Noah's interview discussing the Pacheco Law, please go here: https://soundcloud.com/the-mara-dolan-show/the-mara-dolan-show-with-guest-noah-berger

Senate tax plan would benefit all residents

The Salem News, June 1, 2015

In analyzing the impact of these reductions, the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center reported that 25 percent of the benefits have gone to the top 1 percent of earners making an average annual salary of $2.57 million.

Norwood Rep. John Rogers talks Earned Income Tax Credit

Norwood Transcript & Bulletin, June 1, 2015

“Doubling the state Earned Income Tax Credit could raise incomes of some low-income working families by $900 per year,” said Noah Berger, executive director of the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center. “Money could be used for basic necessities such as rent, food and taking care of kids, or it could be used for things like after-school programs.”

Boost participation in school breakfast programs

Boston Globe, May 31, 2015

A report by the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center, which was commissioned by the Eos Foundation, calculated that statewide, low-income schools would bring in an additional $25 million per year in breakfast reimbursement if breakfast participation rose to 80 percent.

Elevated concern: More than 1 in 5 elevators lack inspection

Boston Herald, May 27, 2015

This year’s budget allowed the department to boost its roster to as high as 70 inspectors, using an additional $2.8 million — paid for through inspection fees — for the hires, according to an analysis last year by the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center.

Senate, Baker at odds over how to help low-income workers

Boston Globe, May 27, 2015

Across the country, more than one of every five households gets money through the EITC. That includes more than 400,000 tax filers in Massachusetts, according to an analysis by the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center.

Bay State losing ground as national leader: Editorial

Springfield Republican, May 25, 2015

According to the Annie E. Casey Foundation and the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center, 16 percent of children age out of the child welfare system without a permanent family, compared to 10 percent nationally. Seventeen percent are placed in group homes, as opposed to 14 percent nationally, and the state also trails in placing children with relatives.

MA Lags in “Family Placement” for Kids in Child Welfare

Public News Service, May 19, 2015

Noah Berger, president with the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center, says there is significant room for improvement when it comes to kinship care. "When a child needs to be taken out of their home, it can often be an advantage for that child to be placed with a grandparent or an aunt," says Berger. "Massachusetts is doing more of that but we still lag behind the national average in terms of how many kids get to those kin placements."

Report: Massachusetts trails in placing foster children with families

Springfield Republican, May 19, 2015

A new report released Tuesday finds that Massachusetts trails the national average when it comes to placing foster children with families.

Senate votes to increase state’s earned income tax credit

Boston Globe, May 19, 2015

An analysis by the left-leaning Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center shows the mix of tax changes approved by the state Senate — freezing the income tax, increasing the earned income tax credit, and bumping up the personal exemptions — would have a relatively modest impact on most taxpayers when compared with the alternative: allowing the state income tax rate to decline, as expected, from 5.15 to 5.1 percent next year under a formula designed to eventually bring the rate down to 5 percent.

Mass. early retirement push: Fears voiced about lack of experienced workers

Worcester Telegram & Gazette, May 16, 2015

Noah Berger, president of the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center, said the problem is not just the number of qualified people leaving, but the fact they're all leaving at once creating a jolt to the system. "There is a danger of brain drain," Berger said. "If we have four or five thousand people leave rapidly there's a danger that a lot of those people may have skills and expertise that are difficult to replace."

Momentum grows for doubling of earned income credit

Brockton Enterprise, May 10, 2015

“Doubling the state Earned Income Tax Credit could raise incomes of some low-income working families by $900 per year,” said Noah Berger, executive director of the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center. “Money could be used for basic necessities such as rent, food and taking care of kids, or it could be used for things like after-school programs.”

Lewis, Berger talk budget at Memorial Hall

Melrose Free Press, May 10, 2015

“If you think of how much income is created in Massachusetts, we have to think about how much of that we’ll spend on state services,” Berger said. “Taxes comes out to about 10 percent of our income. That’s pretty close to the national average. It’s a bit surprising because people think of us as ‘Taxachusetts.’”

Report: Reducing Class Sizes To 15 Could Boost School Achievement

WBUR Learning Lab, May 6, 2015

“What we see in looking at states that have reduced class sizes is that if you do it right — that is if you can get class sizes in the early grades down to about 15 students with well qualified teachers — it can have very significant effect in improving student learning,” Noah Berger, president of MassBudget, said.

Tax cuts that continue to haunt Mass

Boston Globe - Op-Ed, February 12, 2013

Tax policy debates are about how we pay for the things we do together for our communities, our families, and our economy. Working together through government allows us to accomplish things that are vital to us as a Commonwealth and that we can't do alone...About 15 years ago, at the height of the dot-com bubble, our state made tax policy choices that have shaped state policy ever since...The state enacted a series of cuts to the income tax that are now costing us close to $3 billion a year. We cut the tax rate on most income from 5.95 percent to 5.3 percent, costing over $1.5 billion. We cut the tax rate on dividends and interest from 12 percent to 5.3 percent, costing about $850 million. We increased the personal deduction to $4,400, costing $550 million.

Look at what the state is doing right

Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center, January 23, 2011

WITH THE governor scheduled to file his budget proposal for the coming year on Wednesday, and the Commonwealth facing a budget gap of close to $2 billion, knowing that our government provides services as efficiently as possible will be more important than ever.