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Earned Paid Sick Time By the Numbers:
Regional and Local Access In Massachusetts

By Nicole Rodriguez, September 29, 2014
Earned Paid Sick Time By the Numbers
The economic security of working families is strengthened by policies that lead to good paying jobs and that ensure basic protections and flexibility for workers. Earned paid sick time gives workers the flexibility to address health issues without having to sacrifice their jobs, their wages, or their family responsibilities.  To show how this issue affects people in communities across Massachusetts, this brief examines the local rates of workers without access to earned paid sick time.

About one in three workers in Massachusetts does not have access to earned paid sick time. This issue affects people in every community of our Commonwealth.  The least likely to have it are the lowest wage workers, those who can least afford to lose a day’s pay.  In fact, more than half of workers earning under $35,000, roughly 54 percent, do not have earned paid sick time. But the issue also affects a lot of other workers throughout the state. (See Earned Paid Sick Time – Frequently Asked Questions). Compelling research shows us that these basic workplace protections can help both businesses and employees thrive. For more detail, please see: Balancing Work and Family: The Economic Effects of Earned Paid Sick Time.

The table below outlines the local rates of workers in Massachusetts that do not have paid sick time.


Workers Lacking Earned Paid Sick Time by Cities and Towns

NORTH

% w/o EPST

Billerica, Andover, Tewksbury, & Wilmington

30%

City of Lowell

40%

Central Essex County (inc. Amesbury & Haverhill)

32%

East Essex County (inc. Salem, Beverly, Gloucester, & Newburyport)

34%

Northwestern Essex County (inc. Lawrence, Haverhill, & Methuen)

39%

South Essex County (inc. Lynn, Swampscott, & Nahant)

39%

Eastern Central Middlesex County (inc. Waltham,  Lexington, Burlington, Bedford, & Lincoln)

31%

Northern Middlesex County (outside Lowell , inc. Dracut, Tyngsborough, Westford, & Chelmsford)

29%

Peabody, Danvers, Reading, North Reading, & Lynnfield

32%

Woburn, Melrose, Saugus, Wakefield, & Stoneham

31%

GREATER BOSTON

% w/o EPST

Cambridge

32%

City of Boston - All neighborhoods

37%

   Boston Neighborhoods Cluster --Allston, Brighton, & Fenway

46%

   Boston Neighborhoods Cluster --Back Bay, Beacon Hill, Charlestown, E. Boston, Central, & S. End

35%

   Boston Neighborhoods Cluster --Dorchester & South Boston

34%

   Boston Neighborhoods Cluster --Hyde Park, Jamaica Plain, Roslindale, & West Roxbury

29%

   Boston Neighborhoods Cluster --Mattapan & Roxbury

44%

Malden & Medford

38%

Newton & Brookline

28%

Northeastern Norfolk & Southeastern Middlesex Counties (inc. Wellesley & Needham)

29%

Revere, Chelsea, & Winthrop

44%

Somerville & Everett

38%

Watertown, Arlington, Belmont, & Winchester

24%

SOUTH/CAPE

% w/o EPST

Attleboro, North Attleboro, Swansea, Seekonk, Rehoboth, & Plainville

31%

Bristol (outside New Bedford City) & Southern Plymouth Counties (inc. Westport, Acushnet, & Wareham)

37%

Central Plymouth County (inc. Middleborough & Pembroke)

34%

Fall River & Somerset

43%

Greater Brockton (inc. Brockton, Stoughton, & Avon)

36%

Greater Franklin (inc. Norfolk & Wretham)

27%

New Bedford & Fairhaven

41%

Plymouth & Bristol Counties (outside Brockton City)

37%

Plymouth, Marshfield, Scituate, Duxbury, & Kingston

34%

Quincy & Milton

33%

Randolph, Norwood, Dedham, Canton, & Holbrook

33%

Taunton, Mansfield, Norton, Raynham, Dighton, & Berkley

35%

Eastern Cape Cod & the Islands (Eastern Barnstable County, Duke, & Nantucket)

39%

Western Cape Cod (Inner Cape Cod Towns & Barnstable)

38%

Weymouth, Braintree, Hingham, Hull, & Cohasset

31%

CENTRAL

% w/o EPST

City of Worcester

37%

East Central Worcester County (inc. Westborough & Northborough)

30%

Framingham, Marlborough & Natick

34%

Northeast Worcester County (inc. Leominster, Fitchburg, & Gardner)

38%

South Worcester County (inc. Sturbridge, Douglas, & Uxbridge)

34%

Southwest Middlesex & East Worcester Counties (inc. Hopkinton, Ashland, & Millis)

29%

West Central Middlesex  & East Worcester Counties (inc. Acton, Concord, & Sudbury)

27%

West Central Worcester County (inc. Hardwick, Spencer, & Brookfield)

33%

Worcester & Middlesex Counties (outside Leominster, Fitchburg, & Gardner; inc. Athol & Sterling)

33%

WEST

% w/o EPST

City of Springfield

40%

Franklin & North Hampshire Counties (inc. Greenfield & Montague)

42%

Hampden County (inc. Chicopee, Ludlow, & Longmeadow)

35%

Pittsfield

38%

West/East Hampden & South Hampshire Counties (inc. Northampton, Belchertown & Chester)

36%

Westfield & Holyoke

36%


map

The table and map above are based on the Institute for Women’s Policy Research analysis of the 2010-2012 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) and 2012 American Community Survey (ACS) and looks at specific geographic areas - Public Use Microdata Areas (PUMAs), which are areas that are large enough to produce reliable estimates. In most cases an area includes more than one city or town. For large areas, the two or three cities or towns are noted. For example, Central Plymouth County includes but is not limited to Middleborough, Bridgewater, and Pembroke. Estimates are based on place of residence, regardless of place of work, and include people 18 years or older, working in private sector or state and local government. Estimates exclude workers in the federal government, the self-employed, and members of the armed forces.

This research was funded in part by the Annie E. Casey Foundation. We thank them for their support but acknowledge that the findings and conclusions presented in this report are those of MassBudget alone, and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the Foundation.