Governor’s FY 2022 Proposal: Short-Sighted Recovery Budget Leaves Opportunity to Chance for K-12, Transportation & More

 
“The Baker Administration’s budget proposal for the upcoming Fiscal Year (FY) 2022 fails to make the level of investments needed to advance racial and economic equity. Our budgets must be antiracist and provide stable housing, quality education, food security, community well-being, health, and economic opportunity for all. This budget does not achieve that vision.
 
1.5 million Massachusetts adults in early January said they are having at least some difficulty paying for usual household expenses, like rent or utilities. The Baker Administration is taking a risk by relying on one-time federal funds to address a housing crisis that existed before COVID, but has been made more acute by the pandemic.
 
In K-12 schools, last year’s delays to implementation of the Student Opportunity Act (SOA) has left our school districts lacking desperately needed funds. While it is commendable that the Governor is making some progress on the SOA, we’ve still lost one year out of the seven that we won’t get back — catching up means doing one-sixth of the SOA. After a year of unpredictability, students need us to deliver on our promises.
 
The proposal excludes any substantial new revenue, running counter to public opinion showing a majority of Massachusetts voters saying they want us to raise taxes on the wealthiest and profitable corporations. Not raising progressive revenue at this time shortchanges essential programs such as K-12 education and transportation, at the time of greatest need. Using federal dollars and Rainy Day Funds are all acceptable maneuvers to balance a strained budget, but more is required if we are to build an equitable recovery that benefits everyone.”

Latest

Most Home Sales Will Not Likely Lead to Fair Share Tax Payments

Even in Massachusetts’ hot housing market with many homes selling for over $1 million, the vast majority of all home sales will not subject the home sellers to a proposed “millionaire’s tax.”

Read More →

A Blast from the Past: Reagan-Era Tax Law Hits Hard

You are not alone if you had never heard of the Massachusetts “tax cap law,” or what is also known as “62F.” This Reagan-era law sets an artificial limit on how much tax revenue Massachusetts can collect, regardless of the current needs of the Commonwealth.

Read More →

Average Income in Massachusetts for Every Occupation Is Below $1 Million

According to the most current federal Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) data for Massachusetts (2021), average income for every occupation listed falls far below the $1 million threshold proposed in the Fair Share Amendment.

Read More →
Scroll to Top

Get news from Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center in your inbox.