MassBudget Brief Explains the State Budget Process to Make it More Accessible

For Immediate Release: January 25, 2022

BOSTON, MA – The budget is a powerful $50 billion tool for building an antiracist and equitable Commonwealth over the coming year. The final budget affects every person in the Commonwealth, deciding which programs, services, and initiatives are funded and which aren’t.

As the Governor prepares to release his budget proposal for Fiscal Year 2023 on Wednesday, the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center (MassBudget) releases State Budget 101, a new publication explaining each step of the eight-month budget process.

Each year the state puts together a budget outlining how much money it expects to bring in (through such things as taxes and fees) and how that money will be spent throughout the next year. It is a statement of values and vision, and should reflect the needs and concerns of the people of the Commonwealth.

“It shouldn’t take a master’s degree to understand a process that has an impact on each and every one of us,” says Nancy Wagman, Research & Kids Count Director at MassBudget and author of the publication. “We want to make sure everyone understands how this important policy tool is created every year so that they can have a say in how we raise and spend public dollars.” 

Key MassBudget staff are available for additional questions or comments upon request.

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Contact Information:
Reginauld Williams, Communications Director,
617-427-1228 x 102, rwilliams@massbudget.org

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